Rama to Become King by Dr. C.S. Shah SignUp
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Rama to Become King
by Dr. C.S. Shah Bookmark and Share
 
To add to the joy of wedding, King Dasharatha announced that Rama, his eldest son, would succeed him to the throne of Ayodhya. Everyone, including the queens, the ministers, and the citizens of Ayodhya were overjoyed with this news. The auspicious day for this noble ceremony was decided accordingly.

Manthara's Provocation

But there was a corner in the palace where this news caused a different reaction. Instead of joy and merriment, the chamber of queen Kaikeyi was tense. The maid-servant of queen Kaikeyi - Manthara by name - was trying to convince the queen how great injustice had been done to her and her son - Bharata. Instead of Rama, her son was the right successor to the throne.

Queen Kaikeyi was puzzled. Her love for Rama and Bharata knew no distinction; to her, her own son Bharata and Rama were equal. In fact, she was overjoyed that Rama would be the next king and Bharata would get opportunity to serve his elder brother. She thought Rama to be the proper choice because of his decent character, nobility, intelligence, bravery, and also because Rama was the son of eldest queen.

Reflecting thus, the queen said to her maid, "O Manthara, why raise this unnecessary controversy on this auspicious and opportune time? Are you not aware of my immense and equal love for both Rama and Bharata? Moreover, Bharata also has no objection and is loyal to Rama."

But Manthara was in a different mood. Boldly she replied, "O honorable queen, pardon me for crossing my limits of modesty, but I must say what I feel to be just and correct towards my Lady and her son Bharata. If Rama becomes the king, your son Bharata would never get opportunity to occupy the cherished throne of Ayodhya. As a mother, should you not help him fulfill his ambition? And have you forgotten the past two boons the king - your husband - Dasharatha has conferred upon you!"

The Story of Two Boons

Manthara was correct in reminding Kaikeyi about the two boons king Dasharatha had promised to her in the past. The circumstances were as follows:

Once in his youth, king Dasharatha was engaged in a ferocious battle with a powerful enemy. Queen Kaikeyi, who was young, brave, and very bold had insisted to accompany her husband in this battle. Both, the king and the queen, were in the same chariot when a major breakdown occurred as one wheel of their chariot got damaged. As such, life of the king was in great peril and danger. But the bold and brave queen was quick to throw her life for her husband's safety. She managed to control the chariot and supported the wheel with her arm! Her arm was bleeding and there was intense pain, but she endured. Her presence of mind and sacrifice resulted in not only saving the life of her husband but also his winning the battle.

So pleased was the king with Kaikeyi that he said, "O my beloved, today you have not only saved my life but also have set an example of bravery and presence of mind on the battle field. You have shown that women are not inferior in any way in the matter of bravery and sacrifice. I grant you two boons; ask for any two things or desires and I will fulfill the same for you. Whatever you shall ask I will give it to you. I promise."

With due regards for her husband, the queen told that she would seek her boons later in her life if and when she required anything. And King Dasharatha had agreed to this condition.

Thus, Manthara reminded the queen of those almost forgotten promises the king had made to her. She told the queen it was the most opportune time to claim those two promises NOW. And without any delay also suggested what should Kaikeyi demand:

1. Of the first boon, O queen, ask that instead of Rama her son Bharata be given the throne of Ayodhya, and,

2. Of the second, ask for the banishment of Rama to the forest for fourteen years. (Bharata was not present in Ayodhya during all this period.)

The weakness of human nature is very nicely described in the original text. How a small ambition and love for the son takes control of the mind of Kaikeyi that leads to major upheaval later in her own life, and in the lives of her near and dear ones. She would become a widow! as the tragic separation from his most loved son Rama was sure to take life force away from the heart of the king Dasharatha.

We must remember the first episode - story of Shravana - where the old father of dying Shravana, mortally wounded by the arrow of the king, had put the curse on Dasharatha: "I send a curse to you, O king, that you shall also die experiencing the pain and suffering of separation from your son."

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21-Aug-2010
More by :  Dr. C.S. Shah
 
Views: 4389
Article Comment thanks for a more easily understood story, factual and in 'modern terms' .personally I really appreciate the time you have taken to explain this story, in the english transcripts of the original sanskrit, its a bit like shakespeare, hard to grasp the grammatical distinctions of an out of date ye thif and thou doest thuf, remember, even in the days of newton, the s's had a long tail, like an f, with serifs.

Namaste.
Bod

P.S. may we never lose the lessons we have learned.
it would pay humanity to look at the story of mantharas provocation, setting the brothers against each other, without considering worst outcomes and remembering the true cost of losing your loved ones.
back when I was ten, my dad left for the woman over the road, week later, My uncle keith, was shot in belfast, defending and being attacked by people, who for all intents and purposes were fighting a war of attrition and revenge. keith was 18, with the glosters, he is now in arnos court cemetry. the same day keith was laid to rest in a military funeral, a young lad of 17, also shot in that incident was being buried in belfast.
lose/lose. cest la guerre. dads joined him now, even at the end, the other woman, told him to get off the phone, etc. any how, last time I called he said just a pleasant sounding goodbye, censored life till the end. I am considering that perhaps keith, who had the shorter innings, at least was following his passion, and I think my dad spent the last 42 years, regretting his passion! poor dad, her son only ever called him by his christian name, never dad. so he is one brother, he gets to inherit dads home. my sisters and I, nowt, I never even knew him, though to me he was my dad.

dear reader, youtube tank park salute, billy bragg, listen, read the lyrics, understand the damage a broken man and a broken marriage, living across the street, and there may well have been the berlin wall. no contact. I didnt realise it then, but it must have broke his heart too. like I said, lose/lose/lose.

for now I have an ex wife, who when I was made redundant, said I was not seeing the kids, I am going to CSA, the MO is to used the kids as pawns, no money, no kids. who wants to call, when its 100% abuse and a possible yes, or the more usual no, we all hate verbal, and emotional abuse, I feel sorry for the kids, and missed them terribly. thanks for listening, sure its a common story.

the behavioiur of common care and considering others, needs to be rekindled.
bod sheridan
09/26/2014
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